Computational Perception Group

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The research carried out in the Computational Perception Group lies at the interface between three fields:

  1. computer perception which builds systems for processing and understanding images, sounds and videos
  2. neuroscience which is the scientific study of the nervous system
  3. machine learning which provides a theoretical framework for learning and making inferences from data
The goal of the research is to develop systems that solve important problems, drawing inspiration from the brain. For example, determining how many sound sources there are in an acoustic scene and what the individual contributions from each source are. There are medical and engineering applications of this work, such as in intelligent hearing aids and cochlear implants for the deaf. Importantly, the behaviour of these algorithms can also be compared to neural processing in the brain in order to better understand what the brain is doing.

We collaborate very closely with both experimental neuroscience groups, who research the neural basis of hearing, hearing aids and cochlear implants, and also industrial partners such as Google.



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News

31 / 04 / 14 Submitted a new paper entitled "Time-frequency analysis as probabilistic inference"
01 / 03 / 14 Postdoctoral position available in the group
28 / 10 / 13 the Group's research features on the BBC World Service's technology programme, Click
05 / 10 / 13 PhD students Alex Navarro, Yingzhen Li and Thang Bui join the group
02 / 10 / 13 news article published in Wired Magazine about the group's research
07 / 05 / 13 Richard Turner awarded an EPSRC First Grant
22 / 02 / 13 Richard Turner awarded a Google Faculty Award
01 / 02 / 13 Richard Turner awarded a de Turkhiem Grant from Trinity College Cambridge
01 / 09 / 12 Richard Turner appointed Lecturer in Computer Vision and Machine Learning
more...

 
Best viewed with Firefox 3, Safari 4 or Explorer 8. 2009 Computational & Biological Learning Lab, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge